News from IPR World

2/2015 11.5.2015
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In recent weeks we have heard that geographical indications (GI) has the potential to provide socio-economic benefits for developing countries and the Economist tells why is nobody likes patent trolls

  • According to IPR Help Desk the European Patent Office (EPO) released recently a brief insight entitled “Patents for software? European law and practice”.  The purpose of the document is to show the important points connected with the patentability of software and to provide an overview of EPO’s examination practices for software patent applications. According to IPR Help Desk the report illustrates a useful information source of information for companies dealing with software and patents. Read more from here: https://www.iprhelpdesk.eu/node/2960
  • The IP Watch provides an interesting insight on geographical indications as an engine for development. According to speakers at a side event to the World Intellectual Property Organization Committee on Development and Intellectual Property (CDIP) geographical indications has the potential to provide socio-economic benefits for developing countries. Read more from here: http://www.ip-watch.org/2015/04/23/geographical-indications-an-engine-for-development-eu-panellists-say-at-wipo/
  • The IP Watch mentions on their news web site a brief by United Nations, which states according to an UN Expert that secret trade negotiations may bring a threat to human rights. According to IP Watch’s web site “the United Nations independent expert on the promotion of a democratic and equitable international order had raised concerns over the lack of awareness about the negative effects that free trade and investment agreements have on human rights, especially in developing countries”. Read full story from here: http://www.ip-watch.org/category/ip-policies/patent-policy/
  • The Economist outlines an interesting article on patent trolls and discusses the question why nobody likes patent trolls. The article further mentions the abuse of the patent system benefits neither inventors nor the economy at large. Read more from here: http://www.economist.com/news/business-and-finance/21645604?zid=317&ah=8a47fc455a44945580198768fad0fa41